ALERTS

CHEERS

SealWatch.org is dedicated to the general well-being of harbor seals and to vigorous enforcement of applicable law for their protection. Alerts will be posted here of documented instances of continued disturbance or threats to harbor seal safety and habitat; Cheers will be posted when new efforts have been made to extend protection.
updated 6.25.15

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CHEERS FOR ANHSC 20 YEARS

ANHSC LOGO and MISSION

Uqutengqerrtuci? ("Got seal oil?" in Yupik)
 
The Alaska Native Harbor Seal Commission was organized in May, 1995. It is a non-profit 501(c)3 organization comprised of Alaska Native Lands Claims Settlement Act Regions and a consortia of tribes within the habitat range of the harbor seal off the coast of Alaska. It is a member of the Indigenous Peoples Council for Marine Mammals, and has a harbor seal co-managment arrangement with the National Marine Fisheries Service. Donations are tax-exempt.
 
ANHSC was centrally involved in Exxon Valdex restoration assessments, and maintain close stewardship of harbor seal populations through trained Local Research Associates, and annual Harvest Data Surveys. They are critical resources for research bio-sampling, and back current science with millennia of traditional wisdom. A recent botulinus outbreak in some subsistence communities underscored the importance of knowing and following the old ways. Using modern social media such as Facebook, a new generation is learning the best of what their elders have always known.

 

ALERT FOR OFF-SHORE WIND FARMS

WINDFARM

Scientists at the Sea Mammal Research Unit of the University of St. Andrews in Scotland have found that the hearing of harbor seals could be damaged by offshore turbine construction, which produces some of the loudest man-made sounds underwater.
 
According to a Scottish Oceans Institute news item, the implications of these findings are that regulators and industry may need to investigate both the reduction of sound levels and the deterenece of seals from risk zones. The abstract of the technical article in the Journal of Applied Ecology has been placed online.

Image by SteKrueBe, used under Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike license